Skip to main content

Advocates

Advocates

PROTECTION FOR EVERY BODY

March 4th is World Obesity Day.

This World Obesity Day, everybody must come together to call on governments and decision makers to introduce policies and protections that address the environmental, social and commercial roots of obesity.

ADVOCATES

Ogweno’s Story: A product of my environment.

My experience of obesity began in my childhood. Coming from a poor background I was brought up in environments full of carbs, where healthy food was considered expensive. Our built-up neighborhood had little space for activities, and poverty and poor eating meant I rapidly gained weight. 

Growing up, I didn't face stigma. Instead, in Kenyan culture, I was considered healthy and these myths around obesity cushioned me. However, as a teenager, I began to notice my body. I started focussing on healthy food and physical exercise. Initially I was discouraged when I didn't lose weight as I'd expected, but at university, I discovered a love for body building and developed a successful project focussing on being fit, rather than slim. I am now pursuing a Masters degree in global health. I advocate for improved obesity education and healthy environments that help people focus on factors that may be within their own control, rather than have to manage obesity and stigma alone. 

Ogweno, Nairobi, Kenya

My experience of obesity began in my childhood. Coming from a poor background I was brought up in environments full of carbs, where healthy food was considered expensive. Our built-up neighborhood had little space for activities, and poverty and poor eating meant I rapidly gained weight. 

Growing up, I didn't face stigma. Instead, in Kenyan culture, I was considered healthy and these myths around obesity cushioned me. However, as a teenager, I began to notice my body. I started focussing on healthy food and physical exercise. Initially I was discouraged when I didn't lose weight as I'd expected, but at university, I discovered a love for body building and developed a successful project focussing on being fit, rather than slim. I am now pursuing a Masters degree in global health. I advocate for improved obesity education and healthy environments that help people focus on factors that may be within their own control, rather than have to manage obesity and stigma alone. 

Ogweno, Nairobi, Kenya

ROOTS: A framework for action

Together we can create a healthier future.

Obesity organisations around the world are advocating for national and global policy changes to address the root causes of obesity. The ‘ROOTS’ Framework provides suggestions for obesity policy and advocacy that can be adapted to different national settings. It has been developed with the input of obesity experts and organisations across the globe. Although our recommendations are not all universally applicable, they provide ideas and inspiration that can be adopted or adapted in various settings to address the root causes of obesity. We hope that you find it useful.

Recognise officially that obesity is a chronic, multifactorial disease as well as a driver of other diseases, with serious implications for individuals, families, societies and economies. Read more here

Obesity monitoring and surveillance, and innovative research into the causes and effective strategies for preventing and treating obesity, must be vigorously promoted and supported. Read more here

Obesity prevention strategies must be developed, tested and implemented across the life course, from pre-conception, through childhood, and into older age. Read more here

Treatment of obesity, using evidence-based, dignified, non-stigmatising and person-centred approaches – including behavioural, pharmacological, digital, nutritional, physical-activity based and surgical interventions – should be accessible to all people with obesity. Read more here

Systems-based approaches should be applied to the management of obesity, aimed at strengthening health systems, enabling obesity’s incorporation into primary and secondary care, and addressing the environmental, social and commercial roots of obesity. Read more here

$1

TRILLION

The medical consequences of obesity will cost over $1 trillion by 2025

Use your voice!

Our leaders and policy makers can address some of the global impacts of this disease by taking decisive action on the roots of obesity – but right now, not all of them are listening.

Obesity affects 100s of millions of people around the world. People must be protected from unhealthy and unsafe environments. Health systems must be strengthened to ensure people with obesity have access to safe, quality care. Because every body needs everybody.

Global Obesity Forum Declaration: Obesity and the response to COVID-19

Global Obesity Forum Declaration: Obesity and the response to COVID-19

This Declaration is inspired by calls from the World Health Organization, the United Nations, and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development to ‘build back better’ from COVID-19, to improve the health of people and planet. It reflects a consensus reached at the Global Obesity Forum 2020 and sets out recommendations for immediate action across the obesity spectrum from prevention to treatment, within the context of COVID-19.

read the declaration

Resources

Advocates

COVID-19 and Obesity Resources

  • PDF
  • ZIP

Info Resources

  • PDF
  • PNG
  • ZIP

Basic Resources